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on the u.s. military and diplomatic officials, to keep us safe and well. 9/11 brought terrorism to our homeland. two wars in iraq and afghanistan have placed around 60 million people in the taliban military. the current outbreak of new, dangerous infectious disease test our ability of strength. the commitment of america's health challenges on hiv/aids, malaria has elevated global health to a new and costly u.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year caree
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
a membership organization. our website is www.eps u.s.a..org. and i would invite all of you who are here and all who may be watching to visit the website. and if you share the goals and objectives of the organization to join us, or to lend us your support. we have a great advantage in privilege of having a very strong supporter and great friend in bernard schwartz, after whom this symposium is named. bernard planned to be here this morning, was not able to get here, but i do want to say that we at eps are tremendously appreciative of the bernard, of your encouragement and your backing over quite a long time now, and though this symposium series. -- and other this symposium series. strip to essentials, the fiscal cliff is a device constructed in effect of course a rollback of social security, medicare, medicaid, among other programs. as the price of avoiding tax increases and disruptive cuts in federal civilian and in the military, it was partly fortuitous, given the expiration dates of the tax cut, but also partly policymaking by hostagetaking, timed for this moment following the 2012 el
'm announcing my decision as to which party, if any i will soothe with in my work here in the u.s. senate. before doing so i would like to outline my thinking on this issue and set out the principles that has guided my decision. in answering this, who will you caucus with question repeatedly with during the campaign, and i emphasize the word repeatedly, i established two basic criteria, that i wanted to maintain my independence as long and as thoroughly as possible, while at the same time being effective in my representation of maine. the first option i considered was whether i could literally go it alone. and not align myself with either party and operate entirely outside of the current partisan structure of the senate. although tempting in many ways, it is become apparent from extensive research into the senate rules and precedents as well as discussions with those familiar with the operations of the senate that this simply wouldn't be practical. and in fact, would severely compromise my ability to be effective on behalf of maine. the principle disadvantage of this go it alone approach
politics? nine, ron paul says the election shows that the u.s. is now far gone. okay. but are we really seeing a strong resurgence of it to support her moxie with a hole that needs of new participants? and i think curtis gans may want to talk about it. and, finally, number 10, as we relate to substance, for our fiscal cliff and monumental decisions affecting the debt, deficit, sequestration, taxes, and everything else this country faces, one in the election result puts us closer to a solution? so given those 1015 questions that i don't know anybody in right on because i did myself lastly, i turned over to my distinguished colleague, john fortier. thank you all. >> now we will quiz the panelists on those questions, but what we're going to do, i'm going to introduce the panelist. each of us will give a five or six minute take on what we than most important about the election, we will have a little discussion and then go to the audience. i'm going to keep the buyers brief. you have them in your chairs, these are very accomplished people, if we spent all or someone that we would have anytim
, and i think we think it's more likely than not that democrats will gain seats in the u.s. senate. that was unthinkable six months ago. it's going to lead to real recriminations inside the republican party about who made these mistakes and getting these candidates and failing to get people like todd akin out of these races and get electable republicans into these races that they have to be able to win. >> if you look at senate republicans other the last four cycles, they've been pummeled. in 2006 democrats weren't supposed to pick up the senate, they did. in 2008 they expanded to a 60-seat majority, they were able to get health care done as a result of the pickup that they had. in 2010 you had republicans have an opportunity to pick up the senate, they fell short. and now again a huge opportunity this year to pick up the senate, and it looks like they might actually fall backwards because of these races you're talking about, massachusetts, indiana and missouri. i think one of the things that we've learned over the last couple of cycles is when republicans talk about the economy as
as a dismal failure certificate is drawn. just curious about your reaction to that. >> u.s. to take these first? >> a dismal failure part i think will be on the right to find us a dismal failure. it was about as dismal a failure as john kerry. their racism the difference between romney losing in bush winning, with just a slight demographic shift in the country from 2004 to 2012. looking not where the republicans go, again, i think the best way to approach a is to try to figure out how you deal with a group -- the key groups. if you done better among women and with the help of todd akin and richard murdoch, you look in their small part. immigration is gearing to the right on immigration and his unwillingness to have a discussion with the voters. with african-american voters and ronnie doesn't have anything to do with this. all the talk about voter suppression for democrats trying to cheat, just increase the turnout tremendously among african-american voters. >> two parts. one of the primary and one in the general that i thought really? the first would be the debate in which he sittin
think are some concrete ways in which u.s. national security can be improved through help intervention beyond cross border infectious disease control. >> anybody care to take that one? >> i will be glad to respond. there has been a lot of debate. you and i have had a lot of debate in this area. we thank csi as for bringing us together. we never would have met otherwise. there's a wide diversity of opinion on this topic. it seems to me the global health security in terms of a rapidly expanding disease is something everyone would agree is something we should prevent. admiral fargo whose video early on was once asked why do all the cooperation stuff in the pacific? there are no wars going on. he said your point? he felt strongly by engaging other countries, talking about military, engage in other countries in peaceful areas we could have discussions would lead to a more stable likelihood of a more stable environment and i would put that forward as a way of engaging other countries and hopefully by closing the gap which i believe has happened over the last several years between the militar
good we do: inside the u.s. house of representatives." this is about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm evan smith, i'm the ceo andy editor-in-chief of the texas tribune. i am pleased to be here with myt old buddy, robert draper, av veteran magazine writer and author whose latest book is "doy not ask what good we do." robert is a familiar face around these parts having spent thei meaty, early part of his career as one of texas monthly'sil marquee writers, in fact, us being up here together again ise kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage.rkey [laughter] eing a bit together again is kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage. he is currently a contributing writer to the new york times magazine and national geographic and a correspondent for gq. his previous books include dead certain and critically acclaimed biography of george w. bush, a comprehensive history of rolling stone magazine, and a novel, hadrian's walls. a native of houston and its and the university of texas at austin. please join me in welcoming robert draper. [applause] nice to see you. >> nic
u.s. house members that lost in their primaries as the purification process. that's the reason we have the subtitle in the book which is written not by me but by the others in the atlantic magazine having turned republicans and democrats and to americans is because they're focused on party tom and north have come, too. when you look what happened to yesterday in indiana, lugar losing and i think there was a terrible thing that he lost but when he lost he lost in the republican primary when robert bennett lost in utah. when mike castle lost in delaware and the republican primary i don't know what would have happened of lugar would have been able to run among all of the voters in indiana but we have created a system here in which the parties themselves can prevent the voters to be able to choose among other options you have the parties that are dominated by the people that have the most partisan, the most ideological and that is what moves the process forward. they do that in the congressional redistricting and in how the parties choose. i think tom is a great guy. he's very smart.
they selected the officer that had the best sense of smell to go to the door so they were not really going -- u.s said knock and talk is okay. >> they are okay but under your hypothetical it appears that the knock and talk wasn't really what the officer was going up for. >> you are on a really slippery slope with that answer. there is still a motive with everything the police officers do. they are not to hold the person comes to the door and that they can see something from the door. they always have a motive, you are suggesting what? in terms of our rule deselect everybody with a sense of smell because they have a tip of drugs in the house that we given that situation? the assumption that they went to investigate? >> the rule and asking the court to rely on is not the intent of the police officer. the rule and asking the officer -- >> he asks the neighbor who are you? i've gotten a report and i am selling drugs. i know you have drugs in there. >> that would be fine. it would be planas now. >> if it smells first and ask the question second that's not okay? >> what's not okay is if he goes up ther
much of the u.s. cable coverage that i was seeing about the drug war, especially in this part of the country, to me seemed woefully decontextualized. it felt like rubbernecking body count journalism. x number of people were shot on the state. this person was be headed there, but no context. no background, no history, the deepening of the story. i'm by no means a expert on mexico's drug war, but i did have a very strong interest in this region and in. i began researching as early as -- in itjuana. i began researching in 2007 while looking for another story. unlike other journalists, who do not have the amount of time that you often need to tell the stories, when i was in production i had a little over two years to spend with the story. that is enough time to deepen your sense of a place, an institution, to gain trust and to hopefully have a deeper narrative. whether or not i succeeded at -- or failed is up to the audience and the people who push back on my perspective, but for me the ability to spend time with an issue, too deep and your understanding of that issue, provide the
hampshire and they fought over it and actually the state making part of vermont has its reflection in our u.s. constitution. the article and the clause talks about how states will be made in the constitution. was really a result of the constitution new york had with new hampshire and vermont about who is going to own it and how was vermont going to be a separate state? so we had that influence sunday from the constitution making of our country. so the cover image is a detail of painting, a few of 1875 by frank child. the reason we put it on the cover, if you look at the whole of it, you see it's got everything about vermont you need to know. it's got mountains, fields, cows, it's got a bad road, it's got an industry building there. it's got little houses, a church, a meeting house. in a sense, it's a microcosmic view of what the state is about and the tension between those. the mountains have been not only geographic figure, but marvel comes out of it. it's been an economic resource. it's an agricultural state. we have had industry here from early on not as big as elsewhere, but everything go
in stoneridge. does the u.s. have a special relationship with israel? gibson: it is a special relationship. as a young man, 26 years old in the persian gulf war, as we were making our move up towards iraq and having the opportunity for a few minutes to listen to the bbc and here that some of those were landing in israel, i will tell you that at that point, the student of history and i feared for regional and maybe even a world war. we asked israel at that moment to do something that no country should never ask another country. that was not retaliate. israel did that. even though they had people killed and property destroyed. they did that for us. i cannot even adequately describe. i could not fully understand. i could certainly receive the information, but i could not understand. i will never forget that. it is a very special relationship and we share the same values and democratic process. israel is a friend that we will always be there for. proud to support the agreement that we have with them, making sure that they are prepared to defend themselves, just about $3 billion a year and 70%
entirely tied to the fiscal cliff -- >> the u.s. senate is about to meet for a brief pro forma session. we will return to this discussion on the fiscal cliff after that. this is a pro forma session of the senate. no legislative business is plan. most senators have gone on the thanksgiving holiday break. they are meeting every three days during this break in a pro forma session. the house is in session. legislative work wrapping up today, working on a bill to normalize trade relations with russia. this is live senate coverage on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., november 16, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate stands adjourned until 12:00 p.m. on tuesday, november 20, 2012. adjourn: >>
that karl rove was the big loser of 2012. we have to add another name to that, scott reid. the u.s. chamber of commerce won about one or 14 or 15 senate races they played in. it also intervened in the missouri race in the primary, and their candidate lost to todd akin. so even with all that money, it didn't effect the races that the democrats knew about this outside money which they didn't know in 2010 and were prepared themselves. they had their own super pacs, their own outside groups, and they were able to win a lot of those races and, basically, money they were on parity. >> thank you, jonathan. i'm going to turn it over to jim pinkerton who served in the reagan and bush administrations. he's also a political analyst with the fox news channel, and he's a regular on fox news. so what do you think happened last night, and what does it mean for america? >> well, thank you, jennifer. and i apologize for being late. i was late for reasons i'll get into in a moment. um, you know, look, i worked in the political affairs office under ed rollins way back in the stone age, so i can never resist s
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
right now, i think the foundation for u.s. helps the economy, create jobs, gives consumers a certainty which means gives businesses confidence, that they're going to consumers during the holiday season, is if we right away say 90% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. and what we can then do a shape a process whereby we look at tax reform, which i'm very eager to do. i think we can simplify our tax system. i think we can make it more efficient. we can't eliminate loopholes and deductions that have a distorting effect on our economy. i believe that we have to, to continue to take a serious look at how we reform our entitlements. because health care costs continue to be the biggest driver of our deficits. so, there is a package to be shaped, and i'm confident that parties, folks of good will in both parties can make that happen. but what i'm not going to do is to extend b
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18

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